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MEET DR. GETZELL



Dr. Getzell had severe visual problems as a child. Going through optometry school, he had the opportunity to experience a variety of different visual training techniques. It wasn't until he studied the works of Dr. Amiel Francke, who approached vision from a mind/body approach, that he noticed dramatic changes in performance and expanded his own concept of what a tremendous impact a vision problem can have on our daily lives and every moment.

Dr. Getzell's approach to vision problems is only shared by a few specialists throughout the country due to the tremendous amount of study required.  As mentioned above, there are a wide variety of techniques available in visual training.  Dr. Getzell specializes in treating the underlying cause to the vision problem from a mind/body perspective rather than an eye-hand coordination approach, and also uses lenses therapeutically to enhance his patients'  progress.  As such the benefits are more in-depth than with other programs.  Specifically, the results not only include more organized reading and writing activities, but also include improved self-esteem, more cooperative, compliant, and happier children and/or adults who are also better able to follow multiple directions.




Having seen first hand the difference in the various visual training and/or vision therapy techniques, it was an easy decision for Dr. Getzell to devote his career to helping patients who are struggling in life due to deficiencies in their vision.

Dr. Getzell earned his doctor of optometry degree from the Illinois College of Optometry, and has completed a great deal of postgraduate work.  He has been invited to give talks, presentations, and inservices to groups both in the United States and abroad.  Dr. Getzell is a member of numerous professional organizations, including both the American and Illinois Optometric Associations, the College of Optometrists in Vision Development, the Optometric Extension Program, and the Neuro-Optometric Rehabilitation Association.  The doctor has written articles for and been quoted in numerous professional and lay publications-including The IOA Journal, the Chicago Tribune, Chicago Parent Magazine, the Pioneer Press newspapers, the TBI Challenge (e.g., the official publication of the Brain Injury Association) and Counseling Today Magazine (e.g., the official national publication for school counselors).